Welcome to Eddie Redmayne Web - a comprehensive websites dedicated to actor Eddie Redmayne best known for his roles in Les Misérables, My Week With Marilyn, and The Other Boleyn Girl. This site is determined to bring you the most up to date information on this talented performer and his career. I hope you enjoy your visit!

I have some new stills of Eddie as Stephen from The Theory of Everything.

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Eddie Redmayne Web > Theory Of Everything > Production Stills

The pair, who star together in the Stephen Hawking biopic, discuss their favorite love stories, the appeal of British actors, and Jones’s possible future as Black Cat.

P.S. I love Eddie’s response to what his favorite love story is!

Such a wonderful press interview where Eddie talks about the daunting task of portraying Stephen Hawking.

PopSugar shares the best parts of Eddie’s performance in The Theory of Everything and why everyone is talking “Oscar”.

The Theory of Everything had people buzzing at the Toronto International Film Festival (and was one of our favorite movies), and most of the praise has been directed at star Eddie Redmayne’s performance. Redmayne’s roles in Les Misérables and My Week With Marilyn got the up-and-coming star some attention, but his leading role as Stephen Hawking is the one that’s going to put him on the map. With critics already predicting a best actor nomination for Redmayne, we’re breaking down why this performance is so excellent — and award-worthy.

His Physical Transformation
Real-life astrophysicist Hawking was diagnosed with motor neuron disease at 21 and only given two years to live. Of course, Hawking defied that life expectancy and is 72 today. Redmayne portrays Stephen from the time he was an able-bodied college student to Hawking’s state now, in a wheelchair, unable to speak, and with little muscle control. In the film, we watch this degeneration gradually; first Redmayne walks with a cane but is still upright then is forced to use the wheelchair as he loses more and more control. He slurs his speech in the early years, slowly losing his ability to talk, until he’s finally only using his face to communicate (Redmayne has said he’d read that Hawking’s eyebrows were “incredibly expressive.”). The actor also wore prosthetic teeth and ears, and combined with the contortions he’s forced into in the wheelchair, the physical performance alone is mind blowing.

The Emotional Performance
The film is based on Jane Hawking’s book Travelling to Infinity: My Life With Stephen, and while we do learn a great deal about his career, the movie is more of a portrait of Jane (Felicity Jones) and Stephen’s relationship. Thus, we watch him deal with the frustration of his physical state while experiencing the joys of a loving marriage and the birth of his children. There’s so much emotion here, and Redmayne commands your attention and empathy.

His Overall Triumph in Portraying a Real, Three-Dimensional Person
An unexpected aspect of Redmayne’s performance is how charming he manages to be, even when (and sometimes especially) he can’t move or speak. Of course, the implementation of a speech-generating device serves to preserve much of Stephen’s sense of humor, while Redmayne’s evocative expressions show you that there’s still a whole person inside, despite his paralysis.

The Daily Mail gives us this great article where Eddie talks about wedding planning with Hannah!

Eddie Redmayne and his fiancée are planning a winter wedding — complete with fake movie snow.

The award-winning actor, whose stunning portrayal of renowned physicist Stephen Hawking is a main Oscar hopeful, will marry Hannah Bagshawe, his girlfriend of three years, in December. And his bride is determined that the wedding will be a winter wonderland.

Redmayne told me: ‘Hannah’s like: “Well, you work at Pinewood studios — can’t you fix up some fake snow?”’

Redmayne joked that he could imagine some of the directors he has worked with shouting ‘Action!’ as the snow machine whirred into life.

When I asked why he and Hannah, an antiques dealer, were getting married at a time when temperatures plunge, he explained: ‘Because Hannah and I and Hannah’s dad and my mum are all fans of the hymn In The Bleak Midwinter and wanted an excuse to sing that at a wedding.’

The 32-year-old gives the performance of his career as Hawking — who was diagnosed with terminal motor neurone disease at the age of 21 and has now lived with it for more than 50 years — in Working Title’s The Theory Of Everything.

He stars with the sublime actress Felicity Jones in the movie which, at its heart, is a story charting the physics of love between Hawking and his first wife, Jane.

‘It’s an unconventional love,’ Redmayne told me. ‘Love in all its guises: toil and foibles of love and the reality of it as well.’

Redmayne and Jones make for a formidable, utterly believable couple, whether in or out of love.

The actor said Hawking’s not only one of the cleverest men on the planet, he’s also a bit of a rock star.

Redmayne has heard tales of Hawking hanging out with comedian Jimmy Carr and singer Harry Styles.

‘I love that he’s an icon of cool. His essence is complicated to distil because he has an extraordinary joy of life. He has a formidable brain obviously, but he’s also deeply human.

‘There are moments of stubbornness; he’s not a saint either. Also, for me, above and beyond, he’s one of the funniest men I’ve ever met. He’s naughty and witty.

‘Because we project so much onto him, he’s taken on a mythical, almost god-like quality that is iconic.’

To help prepare for the role, he met with physicists who had studied under Hawking. But as Redmayne, an art history graduate, gave up science when he was 12, he had to negotiate a mutual starting point.

‘They’d start at this advanced level, and I said: “Imagine I’m six years old — talk to me as though I don’t know anything.”

‘They gave me a text book and I started reading about tortoises and then Ancient Greece. I was thinking: “I’m about to understand how the universe works!”’

‘And somewhere between pages 15 and 17, they lost me.’

Redmayne enters the award season with two other top-flight British actors vying for top honours: Timothy Spall, magnificent as the artist J.M.W. Turner in Mike Leigh’s masterpiece Mr Turner, and Benedict Cumberbatch, excellent as the genius code-breaker Alan Turing in The Imitation Game.

The Theory Of Everything opens in the U.S. on November 7 and January 1, 2015, in the UK.

InStyle.com gives us this fun new portrait of Eddie & Felciity from TIFF and an article about the things they discussed with Eddie!

See these kids? That’s Felicity Jones and Eddie Redmayne, two incredibly beautiful, wildly talented British actors, and you should get used to seeing their faces now. Their new flick, The Theory of Everything, was one of the buzziest titles of the Toronto International Film Festival and it’s already pegged to be one of this year’s Oscar contenders.

When they stopped by InStyle’s pop-up portrait studio at the fest, Redmayne told us how he completely transformed himself for the project, turning into a younger version of genius Stephen Hawking to tell the love story of the famed physicist and his first wife Jane (Jones) as they face Hawking’s diagnosis of motor neutron disease.

“When I got cast in this part, it was the most extraordinary opportunity,” Redmayne said. “There was a moment of complete ecstatic euphoria that lasted about a second and a half, and from then it’s just been like, fear and trepidation. Because when you’re playing somebody who’s alive, you know that ultimately you’re going to get their judgment.” But it worked out: “When Stephen saw the film and Jane and the Hawking family saw the film—and enjoyed it—that for us was the greatest compliment.”

For Redmayne, it was important to tell this real-life story. “To me, this film is a love story, but an unconventional love story and a love story about love in all its different guises,” Redmayne told us. “It’s young love, it’s passionate love, it’s family love, it’s love of a subject, like science. But it’s also about the flaws and the humanity in trying to upkeep that. So for me, it’s interesting because it’s a film about an incredibly happy ending, but not a Hollywood ending.”

By Ali on Sep 11, 2014 Images Leave a Comment

Okay I got a bit distracted while trying to post these pics! So thrilled to finally see some new photoshoots of Mr. Redmayne that I just got a bit giddy!

Thank you to Luciana, Claudia, & Nicole for sending some of these in and making my day!

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How does one find the right actor to play Stephen Hawking?

Typically, directors and producers do their homework by reviewing an actor’s previous work, looking for clues in the on-screen moments to inspire confidence that a performer has the goods to breathe life into their character. Actor X can do this because he already did that. But unless Daniel Day-Lewis is in the mix, there really is no film resume that suggests an actor can convincingly portray Hawking, the brilliant British scientist whose body is ravaged by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease), the motor-neurone disease that robbed him of his ability to speak on his own.

“[In casting Hawking], you have to take a leap into the dark,” says director James Marsh, who successfully gambled on Eddie Redmayne, immediately propelling the 32-year-old British actor and their film, The Theory of Everything, into Oscar contention after its world premiere at this week’s Toronto International Film Festival. Redmayne, best known in the U.S. for playing Marius in Les Misérables, and falling hard for Michelle Williams in My Week With Marilyn, wowed critics and audiences alike, playing the charming and mischievous academic whose physical condition slowly deteriorates from the moment he’s diagnosed with ALS in the 1960s. In a still-evolving Best Actor race that also includes Foxcatcher‘s Steve Carell and The Imitation Game’s Benedict Cumberbatch, Redmayne might be the one to beat.

“We always have that feeling of euphoria [when we get a role], followed by a few days later of, ‘Oh, I’ve actually got to do it,’” says Redmayne. “In this case, the euphoria lasted under a millisecond [after I hung up the phone], followed by deep, terrifying, overwhelming fear. But [co-star and friend] Charlie Cox (Boardwalk Empire) said to me, when he heard I got the part, ‘The great thing about this job is that it’s one that you can do nothing but give 3,000 percent. That’s not an option.’ And that was totally true.”

By Ali on Sep 11, 2014 Theory of Everything Leave a Comment

The USA Spoke to Eddie in Toronto about how he became Stephen Hawking for The Theory of Everything.

TORONTO — Now that the cat’s out of the bag about The Theory of Everything, all that’s left to do is talk about it. You know, until February.

Redmayne is officially on the glittering treadmill of promotion, and (like certain members of the press who clutch their coffees on these cool Toronto mornings), struggles with setting the proper alarms. “I did that thing this morning when you put on your alarm p.m. instead of a.m.,” says the British actor. His wake-up call was a yelp: ‘Ahh! Morning!’

To become Stephen Hawking (who is now 72), Redmayne studied old photographs of the physicist, met with patients at clinics and worked on his movements with a dancer and vocal coach. But he says the performance was hinged on the devilish wink in Hawking’s eyes, which remains to this day.

“He is incredibly funny,” says Redmayne. “When I met him, that’s what emanated. This wit and humor and this kind of twinkle. Even though he can move so little now he has the most expressive of faces.”

Speaking with Hawking, who suffers from a form of ALS, can be challenging; today he can operate only muscles beneath the eye to communicate. “He has glasses with a sensor. And then he has his (computer) screen, but now with the alphabet. A cursor goes across the alphabet and when he does this (small facial) movement, it stops on the letter,” says the actor.

When The Theory of Everything was finished, Redmayne went to see him. “I said to him, ‘Stephen, I’m terrified. I hope you enjoy it. Let me know what you think.’ And he spent awhile typing away and he just came (back) in his iconic voice and said, ‘I will let you know what I think. Good – or otherwise.’

Redmayne laughs. “I said, ‘Stephen, if it’s otherwise – will you just say ‘otherwise’?’ You don’t need to go into the details.'” Thankfully, Hawking liked it. “Subsequently, he’s been so lovely,” he says.

The true stamp of approval? Hawking lent his voice to the film. And his ex-wife Jane was on set the first day of filming, mussing Redmayne’s schoolboy cut with her hands. “Much messier hair,” she told him.

While at TIFF Eddie participated in a panel discussion for Variety at their studio with Felicity Jones & their director James Marsh. The three discuss their film, about meeting Stephen Hawking before filming started and how they wanted to share this story.