Eddie Redmayne Web
10
Dec 2014
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Ali

Fandango’s Frontrunners features a new interview with Eddie.

09
Dec 2014
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Ali

09
Dec 2014
Comments Off on United Kingdom Premiere of The Theory of Everything
Ali

Tonight is the premiere of The Theory of Everything held in London. Eddie and Hannah were in attendance along with Felicity Jones, Stephen Hawking and Jane Wilde Hawking. I have added a few pics of Eddie at the premiere … will add more as I find them.

Gallery Links:
Eddie Redmayne Web > 2014 > December 9 | The Theory of Everything London Premiere

07
Dec 2014
Comments Off on The Theory of Everything | A bunch of new stills
Ali

Added a bunch of new stills to the gallery of Eddie’s performance as Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything. Enjoy!

Gallery Links:
Eddie Redmayne Web > Theory Of Everything > Production Stills

07
Dec 2014
Comments Off on Eddie Redmayne: ‘To play Hawking I had to train my body like a dancer’
Ali

The Guardian Observer posted this new article about Eddie and his work in The Theory of Everything.

For Eddie Redmayne, playing Stephen Hawking in a film about the brilliant scientist with motor neurone disease was a huge challenge. But the hardest part was meeting the great man himself…

When Professor Stephen Hawking saw The Theory of Everything, the new feature film adapted from his ex-wife Jane Hawking’s memoir Travelling to Infinity: My Life With Stephen, there were moments, he has been reported as saying, when he thought it was himself he was seeing on screen. It wasn’t. It was Eddie Redmayne in the performance of a lifetime (if he does not win an Oscar, there will be an outcry), playing the theoretical physicist from his early days as a PhD student at Cambridge in the 1960s, before he was diagnosed with motor neurone disease (MND), right up to the late 80s and beyond, when A Brief History of Time became a surprise hit, selling more than 10m copies worldwide and making its author the greatest science celebrity since Einstein. In the film, which is the story of a tender, defiant, imperilled marriage, Jane is played by Felicity Jones and Hawking has judged her “charming”. But it is Redmayne’s faithful performance, comparable in its ambition to Daniel Day Lewis’s in My Left Foot, that overwhelms. It reminds one that great acting is about transformation.

It is a mild Sunday afternoon – no such thing as a day of rest for Eddie Redmayne. I wait for him in the green room in the Jerwood Space in London’s Southwark. His Hawking is so fresh in my mind, I half expect him to wheel in. Instead, a handsome, upright young man opens the door. I joke that the rehearsal room is set up as if for a job interview and he laughs – he has a firm handshake (job interviewers like that). But when I congratulate him on his performance, his response is to talk about how great Felicity Jones is: “Felicity is so strong…” I interrupt: “We’re not here to talk about Felicity.”

There is something unearthly, even slightly eerie about Redmayne’s good looks on screen but meeting him now, he has a warm presence, is quick to blush, looks younger than his 32 years. One might almost say he was school-boyish were it not for his beautiful clothes (he once modelled for Burberry, is on Vanity Fair’s international best-dressed list and is not about to fall off it). The look is expensively understated: navy cable-knit sweater, well-cut trousers, classy brown suede shoes.

The room was silent before he came in but will not, by his own sympathetic admission (he is big on self-deprecation), stay that way: “As someone who gets nervous in silences,” he explains, “I spill words rather than really think.” This is nonsense – he thinks about everything. But he reveals that self-consciousness is his greatest fault. “There’s a part of me sitting outside myself observing,” he says. He claims that his best work as an actor is in the rare moments when self-consciousness goes (think of his distraught Marius singing Empty Chairs and Empty Tables in Tom Hooper’s 2012 film Les Miserables).

I have seen The Theory of Everything twice, I tell him, to scrutinise and marvel over its details. “I’m so glad…” he says. And as I look at him, his face stops me in my tracks – partly because I have been studying it so intently on screen. Early in the film, while still cycling round Cambridge, he has a shambolic charm, bites his lips, looks keenly at everything with a not-always-scientific curiosity. When he first meets Jane at a student party, you see love-at-first-sight in the smile that escapes him, brought on by this pretty girl – a radiant reflex.

In the film, and in life too, Redmayne does bashful to perfection. But control of his face, especially in the film’s later stages, was challenging: “The ironic complication was that when Stephen was stillest, it was most energy-consuming for me. His face cannot move but that didn’t mean I could relax mine. It has to get into incredibly contorted positions. I worked on getting into extremes of physicality and then trying to relax. Does that make sense?” I get the impression we could consign an entire hour to eyebrow control alone (Stephen’s mother, in a documentary, once said her son’s eyebrows were especially expressive).

As Hawking’s illness progresses and the muscles in his neck fail to hold his head high, Redmayne must look up rather than across at Jane, cocking his head like a bird, looking sweetly askance from under an untidy fringe. He knows how to convey, in a glance, a private joke across a dinner table. Behind the clunky Hawking specs, his eyes are hazel and there is a transparency about him that is about more than his pale skin – it defines his acting talent too.

But what I want to settle first is what the film does not reveal: how has Stephen Hawking, now 72, miraculously defied MND for 50 years when doctors predicted that, as is the case for most MND sufferers, he had only a couple of years to live?

“People don’t know whether it is to do with the specific strain of the illness. There is another narrative that says it is to do with his drive. But remember, he has extraordinary nursing care and direct contact with Addenbrooke’s hospital in Cambridge.” Redmayne’s reply is circumspect – he is resolved not to pose as Hawking’s spokesman.

The film is circumspect too, careful not to make light of Hawking’s challenges. By the end, Redmayne is in a wheelchair, his body limp as a discarded puppet’s. Was it difficult to find the balance between a depressing portrayal of illness and a falsely upbeat one? He says it was – but wants to backtrack. It matters that people understand this part was not handed him on a plate. He “chased” it – against stiff competition. “I thought it was going to be a biopic but the script was a complicated, intricate and, at moments, difficult love story. And because it was so unexpected, I found it riveting. And I wanted to do it because of James Marsh.” (Director of the Oscar-winning documentary Man on Wire.)

When I speak to Marsh on the phone later, he says: “To say Eddie was hungry for the role was an understatement, he was ravenous.” Redmayne, Marsh continued, had made no secret, “over quite a few beers on his part and quite a few coffees on mine”, that he was daunted too. “It was often quite uncomfortable to see what he had to do. He internalised the part. It took its toll physically, he was inhabiting an illness, which is a complicated thing to do. I was pushing him as far as he could go.”

What most worried Redmayne was that he would let the Hawkings down: “The fear was knowing that Jane and Stephen and Jonathan Hellyer Jones [now Jane’s second husband, beautifully played by Charlie Cox] and the children would see the film. If you are playing someone living, it is a different type of judgment. However much work you do, it is not a documentary, there will be things you can’t get right and, ultimately, you have to take a leap because – you weren’t there.”

You can see why this would torment him because he is a perfectionist. When researching Red, John Logan’s play about Rothko at the Donmar (he played Rothko’s assistant for which he won an Olivier award and a Tony on Broadway), he came upon the words of artist Dan Rice, who argued that art must strive for perfection yet acknowledge that it will never get there.

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06
Dec 2014
Comments Off on The Hollywood Reporter’s Full Actors Roundtable
Ali

The Hollywood Reporter released the video of the full Actors Roundtable featuring Eddie.

Eddie Redmayne (The Theory of Everything), Ethan Hawke (Boyhood), Timothy Spall (Mr. Turner), Benedict Cumberbatch (The Imitation Game) Channing Tatum (Foxcatcher) and Michael Keaton (Birdman) sit down with The Hollywood Reporter’s Stephen Galloway to discuss their craft, their acclaimed performances in 2014 and more.

06
Dec 2014
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Ali

The great thing about a new magazine feature is that it often gives us a new photoshoot and the new one featured in Esquire UK does not disappoint!

Gallery Links:
Eddie Redmayne Web > Outtakes > 2015 > 001

06
Dec 2014
Comments Off on March of Dimes Celebration of Babies
Ali

Last night Eddie attended the March of Dimes Celebration of Babies … such a great cause! Pics from the event are in the gallery. And a big thanks to Claudia for sending some of the pics in!

Gallery Links:
Eddie Redmayne Web > 2014 > December 5 | March of Dimes Celebration of Babies
Eddie Redmayne Web > 2014 > December 5 | March of Dimes Celebration of Babies – Inside

06
Dec 2014
Comments Off on The Theory of Everything Reception
Ali

Yesterday Eddie attended a reception for his film The Theory of Everything in Los Angeles.

Gallery Links:
Eddie Redmayne Web > 2014 > December 5 | The Theory of Everything Reception in Los Angeles

05
Dec 2014
Comments Off on Eddie is Featured in Esquire UK
Ali

There is a new feature on Eddie in the UK edition of Esquire Magazine’s January Issue (the one with Christian Bale on the cover)

To celebrate his career-defining performance as Stephen Hawking in The Theory Of Everything, Esquire invites oscar hopeful Eddie Redmayne to try on the best of this season’s winter coats

When Eddie Redmayne first met Stephen Hawking, the man he plays in the new biopic The Theory of Everything, things didn’t exactly go to plan.

“I’d spent five months studying him on video, so it felt like a drum-roll moment,” the 32-year-old actor says of the day he and co-star Felicity Jones drove to Hawking’s home in Cambridge.

“Felicity stayed in the car for an hour so I could have some time alone with him. I went into his kitchen and he was sitting there. It’s amazing, the aura he has. You’re so used to how he looks — the silhouette and the voice — and I was really nervous. I just waffled: talking about him, to him. It was pretty embarrassing.”

The professor was eventually able to cut into the one way conversation, and Redmayne managed to relax.

“Then Felicity came in and they got on like a house on fire,” he laughs. “Stephen was incredibly flirtatious. A complete player.”

The Theory of Everything tells the story of Hawking when he was still a student at Cambridge in the Sixties, gangly and shy but with a quick wit and rebellious streak that helped him woo his first wife, Jane, played by Jones.

Then disaster struck. Aged 21, Hawking was diagnosed with motor neurone disease and given two years to live — a prediction that, at the age of 72, he continues to defy.

The film charts Hawking’s ascendancy to the rank of world famous genius — ignited by the publication of his groundbreaking theories about black holes in 1988’s A Brief History of Time — alongside the gradual physical decline that left him almost entirely paralysed and only able to communicate through a speech-generating device.

Quite a daunting challenge then, I tell Redmayne over coffee, even for an award-winning stage actor and the star of films including the 2012 adaptation of Les Miserables and the classy BBC miniseries, Birdsong.

“There’s a moment of excitement when you get a part like this, which soon gives way to dread,” he agrees. “We knew if we screwed it up we’d be lambasted because Stephen is such an icon.
“The strange thing about acting in a film is that no one tells you how to do it. I never went to drama school or anything.”

To prepare, the Londoner set about visiting patients suffering from motor neurone disease and studying clips of Hawking on the internet, before spending hours in front of the mirror “practising making my limbs go rigid or wilt”.

“I’m not going to lie, it was demanding and pretty intense. But we had fun, too, just as Stephen does. He doesn’t live a disease, he lives a forward-thinking, funny life.”

It’s an extraordinary performance. As one reviewer has put it, less an impersonation, more an inhabitation, and one threatening to turn Redmayne into a global star and possible Oscar contender in 2015.

Next year, we’ll also see him in the much-anticipated Wachowski siblings’ “epic space opera” Jupiter Ascending. “I thought I was doing some great departure, but maybe I’ve just done King Lear in space,” says Redmayne of working with The Matrix directors. Before that he is getting married to his long-term partner, publicist Hannah Bagshawe.

For now, though, Redmayne says he is focused on making The Theory of Everything as successful as possible.

“I want this story to be seen,” he says. “The stakes were so high. One of the first things my mate Charlie Cox [the actor who also stars] said to me was, ‘The great thing about this part is that you have no option but to give it everything.’ He was right.”



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